The World of the Hero

12 courses, 65 lectures
10:25:10

Classics & Ancient History

Homer

Homer

In this course, Dr Emily Hauser (University of Exeter) provides a comprehensive introduction to Homer. In the first module, we think about the Iliad and Odyssey as ‘oral poems’ and consider this should impact how we read them....

11 lectures

1:41:31

Dr Emily Hauser

Exeter University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Iliad

Homer: Iliad

In this course, Professor Barbara Graziosi (Durham University) explores Homer’s Iliad. In the first module, we focus on the so-called ‘Homeric Question’, focusing on how and when the poem was composed, who composed it, as well...

5 lectures

0:42:39

Prof. Barbara Graziosi

Durham University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Iliad

Homer: Iliad

In this course, we explore several aspects of Homer’s Iliad. The course begins with a consideration of one of the most fundamental questions asked of the Homeric epics – the so-called Homeric Question – which asks whether the...

6 lectures

0:56:14

Prof. Richard Jenkyns

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Iliad: Characterisation

Homer: Iliad: Characterisation

In this course, Professor Richard Jenkyns (University of Oxford) explores the theme of characterisation in Homer's Iliad, focusing in particular on fourteen key characters. In the first module, we think about what we mean by...

5 lectures

0:50:58

Prof. Richard Jenkyns

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Odyssey

Homer: Odyssey

In this course, we discuss four key themes in Homer's Odyssey. In the first module, we concentrate on the concept of oral poetry - the idea that the Odyssey was not originally written down, but passed orally from generation to...

4 lectures

0:28:08

Prof. Edith Hall

King's College, London

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Odyssey

Homer: Odyssey

In this course, Professor Richard Jenkyns (University of Oxford) explores Homer's Odyssey. We begin by thinking about the nature of the poem, focusing in particular on the nature of oral poetry and the Odyssey's relationship...

5 lectures

0:43:41

Prof. Richard Jenkyns

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Odyssey

Homer: Odyssey

In this course, Professor Barbara Graziosi (University of Durham) explores Homer's Odyssey. We begin by thinking about the figure of Odysseus himself, focusing in particular on his status as a man 'of many turns' (Greek:...

5 lectures

0:49:26

Prof. Barbara Graziosi

Durham University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: The Worlds of the Iliad and Odyssey

Homer: The Worlds of the Iliad and Odyssey

In a special set of two lectures, Dr Elton Barker (Open University) explores the worlds of the Homeric epics, suggesting in particular that both the Iliad and the Odyssey question the use of violence as a means of...

2 lectures

0:31:24

Dr Elton Barker

Open University

Classics & Ancient History

Homer: Women

Homer: Women

In this course, Dr Emily Hauser (University of Exeter) explores the status and role of women in the Iliad and the Odyssey. In the first module, we think about why women matter in Homer, and the difficulty of recovering the...

5 lectures

0:46:29

Dr Emily Hauser

Exeter University

Classics & Ancient History

Virgil: Aeneid

Virgil: Aeneid

In this course, Dr Sharon Marshall explores Virgil’s Aeneid through five key questions. In the first module, we think about whether the Aeneid should be read as a pro- or anti-Augustan poem. After that, we explore the nature of...

5 lectures

0:50:47

Dr Sharon Marshall

Exeter University

Classics & Ancient History

Virgil: Aeneid

Virgil: Aeneid

In this course, Professor Llewelyn Morgan (University of Oxford) explores Virgil's Aeneid. In the first module, we think about the theme of the city in the poem, focusing in particular on the centrality of the city of...

6 lectures

1:08:54

Prof. Llewelyn Morgan

Oxford University

Classics & Ancient History

Virgil: Aeneid

Virgil: Aeneid

In this course, we explore several aspects of Virgil’s Aeneid – looking in particular at the following issues: first, Dido and Aeneas, and who we should blame for what happens; second, Augustus, and his influence on the Aeneid;...

6 lectures

0:54:59

Prof. Richard Jenkyns

Oxford University