You are not currently logged in. Please create an account or log in to view the full course.

Solving Equations I – Edexcel GCSE (1MA1): Higher Tier

 
  • Description

About this Course

About the Course

In this course, Professor Keith Ball (University of Warwick) explores solving equations, covering Topics A17-A18 in the Pearson Edexcel GCSE (9-1) Mathematics (1MA1) Specification for Higher Tier. In the first mini-lecture, we give an introduction to solving equations and think about what it means to ‘solve’ and equation. In the second mini-lecture, we discuss how to solve linear equations and how to approximate solutions to linear equations using a graph (Topic A17). In the third mini-lecture, we consider how to solve quadratic equations by factorising and by using the special properties of zero (Topic A18). In the fourth mini-lecture, we learn how to solve quadratic equations by completing the square (Topic A18). In the fifth mini-lecture, we learn how to solve quadratic equations using the quadratic formula (Topic A18). The sixth mini-lecture shows how to derive the quadratic formula by competing the square on the general quadratic equation, ax2 + bx + c = 0 — this is extension content that is not required for exams. In the seventh mini-lecture, we learn how to approximate solutions to quadratic equations by graphing (Topic A18).

About the Lecturer

Keith Ball is a Professor of Mathematics and the University of Warwick. His research interests are in functional analysis, high-dimensional and discrete geometry, and information theory. From 2010-14, Professor Ball served as the scientific director of the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS) based in Edinburgh. He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2013 and awarded the Whitehead Prize by the London Mathematical Society in 1992. Professor Ball is the author of Strange Curves, Counting Rabbits, and other Mathematical Explorations (2006), a recreational maths book aimed at those familiar with basic calculus.

Get instant access to over 6,200 lectures