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Herodotus: Histories

2. Why does the Histories take the form that it does?

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About this Lecture

Lecture

In this module, we think about two aspects of the form of Herodotus’ Histories: first, the overall structure of the work, which follows the expansion of the Persian Empire; and second, his use of sources.

Course

In this course, Professor Robin Osborne (University of Cambridge) explores the Histories of Herodotus. In the first module, we discuss what the Histories are actually about, before thinking about the form of the Histories—its overall structure, as well as Herodotus’ use of source—in the second module. In the third module, we explore how Herodotus presents Greeks and non-Greeks by considering his presentation of the Battle of Marathon, before thinking in the fourth module about the purpose of the various seemingly ‘irrelevant’ stories that can be found throughout the Histories.

Lecturer

Robin Osborne is Professor of Ancient History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge and of the British Academy. He works on Greek History (political, social, economic, cultural) and Greek Archaeology (field archaeology and art history) between 1000 B.C. and 200 B.C, and has published extensively across a range of topics.

Cite this Lecture

APA style

Osborne, R. (2018, August 15). Herodotus: Histories - Why does the Histories take the form that it does? [Video]. MASSOLIT. https://www.massolit.io/courses/herodotus-histories/why-does-the-histories-take-the-form-that-it-does

MLA style

Osborne, Robin. "Herodotus: Histories – Why does the Histories take the form that it does?." MASSOLIT, uploaded by MASSOLIT, 15 Aug 2018, https://www.massolit.io/courses/herodotus-histories/why-does-the-histories-take-the-form-that-it-does