You need to log in or access the site from school to get access to this course, but you can watch the introduction for free!

Athenian Democracy: The Reforms of Cleisthenes

 

Lecturer:

Dr Tom Hooper – Institute of Classical Studies, London

Subject:

Classics

  • About this course
  • About this lecturer

About this Course

In this course, Dr Tom Hooper (University of Cambridge) explores the democracy reforms of Cleisthenes in the early 6th century BC. We begin by thinking about the development of the Athenian constitution in the sixth century, including the reforms of Solon in 594 BC and the Peisistratid regime in the middle of the century. After that, we turn to the events of 508 BC, focusing in particular on whether the democratic reforms that emerged are better understood as a top-down phenomenon, led by Cleisthenes, or a bottom-up one, led by the Athenian people. In the third and fourth modules, we think about two the key elements of Cleisthenes' democratic reforms – first his reorganisation of Attica into demes, trittyes and tribes, and then his establishment of the Council of 500. After that, we think about how the reforms of Cleisthenes could be said to have established democracy in Athens – how did they give 'kratos' ('power') to the 'demos' ('people')? – before turning in the sixth module to the legacy of Cleisthenes' reforms: why did the Athenians of the fifth and fourth centuries not give more credit to Cleisthenes for his role in the establishment of their cherished democratic constitution?

About the Lecturer

Dr Tom Hooper is a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Classical Studies in London as well as a Lecturer and Fellow at Peterhouse College, Cambridge. His research interests include Classical Athens, particularly Athenian Democracy in the period 508-322 BC, and Greek law and political thought. His book, Democracy and Demagogy: Political Leadership and the Emergence of Athenian Democracy, is forthcoming.